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The repeating first and third lines of Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art” claim that “The art of losing isn’t hard to master” and that “loss is no disaster.”

Answer the following exam question and support your interpretation with evidence gained from a close reading analysis of the text. Be sure to mention the author’s use of literary devices such as imagery, metaphor, irony, tone, and symbol.
Your final exam should be a multi-paragraph essay that follows the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, as well as MLA in-text citation rules for the quotation of literary works.
Exam Question
The repeating first and third lines of Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art” claim that “The art of losing isn’t hard to master” and that “loss is no disaster.” How does the rest of the poem support or contradict these claims? How does the theme of loss in this poem relate to at least ONE other work assigned in this class this term?​
Final Exam Reading
“One Art”
By Elizabeth Bishop
The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.
Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.
I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.
—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.
Citation
Bishoiqup, Elizabeth. “One Art.” poets.org/poem/diving-wreck.

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